2018: Week 8 ~ 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks: Heirloom

I’m looking forward to starting another year-long of 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks with AmyJohnson Crow.  If you’ve never joined into this type of a weekly writing blog, check out her 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks site for more information. I first joined in 2014, opening my first blog and proud to say… I completed all 52 weeks on time! My 2014: 52 Week Ancestor Challenge can be found on the previous link.

Week 8 ~ Heirloom

I have several “heirlooms” I’ve inherited from my grandparents, and have written on them the past few years and can be found here on my blog… Friday Night Family Heirlooms.

Let’s take a walk through a few family treasures of Steve’s family that are shared amongst the family.

Uncle Frankie brought out one day a few treasured heirlooms from his father’s “barbering” days. If only those tools could talk… what barbershop tales they’d tell. But most stories told in Grandpa Joe’s barber chair, stayed in the barber chair!

joe cambino barber chair

Steve has many memories of this chair, but it was mostly used for napping once he bought a new chair. Grandpa Joe cut almost all the boys hair in the family and Steve went there for his weekly haircuts… dreading it! It wasn’t where he wanted to spend his afternoon… sitting in the chair, while cigarette smoke swirled around as grandpa cut his hair. If he wasn’t keeping still enough, grandpa quickly grabbed his head to place it where he wanted… and you didn’t dare move or else you’d be yelled at… and your mother would be told that you didn’t behave.

My husband rescued grandpa Joe’s prized radio from a basement cleanup one summer Saturday afternoon as a younger cousin living there was having a tag sale. It was a radio he so remembers as a young boy, sitting on the shelf in grandpa’s barber shop… always playing as he arrived for his haircut; a haircut he always dreaded. (He was reading Click or possibility Clip magazine)

radio

Here is that same radio… and it once sat in the kitchen on the farm!

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Grandma Minnie had several dresses, thanks to the sewing ability of her daughter Nancy; I’m told grandma loved polka dots, which is somewhat funny when you associate her name, Grandma Minnie, with Minnie Mouse… who also loved polka dots! At one point, Nancy made a small lap quilt from remnants of all those dresses… it’s preserved in the home of Grandma’s daughter Dolly.

grandma minnies quilt

I’m sure many will remember some of Grandma Minnie’s dresses!

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Steve remembers Grandpa Joe (Cambino) smoking a pipe and the proof is that we have his pipe rack; another item Steve rescued from his grandmother’s cellar. At the time he took it, he had just begun smoking a pipe… not quite sure how that came about or why anyone would want to, but he enjoyed smoking it and had several fancy pipes.

pipe rack

Grandpa Joe’s Pipe Rack

I hope you’ve enjoyed remembering a few of the family heirlooms!

52 ancesors with name

Like to read more, click on… 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks

© 2018, copyright Jeanne Bryan Insalaco; all rights reserved

Stay tuned for more…

The February Prompts
The prompts for February are:
Week 6 (February 5-11): Favorite Name
Week 7 (February 12-18): Valentine
Week 8 (February 19-25): Heirloom
Week 9 (February 26-March 4): Where There’s a Will

2018: Week 7 ~ 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks: Valentine

I’m looking forward to starting another year-long of 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks with AmyJohnson Crow.  If you’ve never joined into this type of a weekly writing blog, check out her 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks site for more information. I first joined in 2014, opening my first blog and proud to say… I completed all 52 weeks on time! My 2014: 52 Week Ancestor Challenge can be found on the previous link.

Week 7 ~ Valentine

candy box

candy heart

A Valentine box and cards I saved! They don’t come in boxes anymore.

I found the “Valentine” prompt puzzling, as… what do I write about, but like all things… something comes along to jog you into the writing! Hubby brought up a raggedy plastic bag full of cards and letters he found in the cedar chest downstairs; he’s presently restoring the chest and that bag was among the things he pulled out. For a week, that bag sat on the floor in the living room… me ignoring it! Finally one night I picked it up, to finally go through and was surprised at my findings.

letters

“Our Letters”

My “Valentine” of almost 47 years, as of May 3rd… wrote many of those letters to me… first as a guy I’d known for only a few months, then a man I was going to marry and finally as my husband stationed in Thailand. It’s funny to look back at all the letters he wrote… when today the only thing he writes by hand is a grocery list… although he will peck away for a political post on Facebook! I’m the writer… he’s not much of a reader either!

I could have sat all night reading through those letters, but I only opened a few and laughed at my writings to him… how different they were from before and after we married. So mushy and lovey-dovey… surely one day my granddaughters will ooh and ahh over them or laugh hysterically at how mushy their grandparents were! Yes, girls… one time we were young!

Most of the cards I saved from my “Valentine” doesn’t even have a signature on them… his answer was always, “you know who they’re from, why do I have to sign it!” But there are a few signed “Love Always, Steve.”

To show you how smitten he was with me… when in Maine, he even sealed the envelope with a wax seal of “Love” on the envelopes. When I think back now, I have a hard time envisioning him shopping for that stamp and wax… and I so wish I could have a vision of him melting the wax and sealing those envelopes!

love seal

A couple of the envelopes still have the wax stamp intact on them, but most have deteriorated over the years and crumbled off.

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My other Valentine memory is my daughter’s wedding… she married the man of her dreams on Valentine day… Feb. 14, 2012… making such a beautiful bride! Until she met the man of her dreams… Valentines Day was never her favorite day, but today, it holds a much different meaning.

Melissa and Frank

Melissa (Insalaco) and Frank Gillon

Valentine Wedding – Feb. 14, 2012

52 ancesors with name

Like to read more, click on… 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks

© 2018, copyright Jeanne Bryan Insalaco; all rights reserved

Stay tuned for more…

The February Prompts
The prompts for February are:
Week 6 (February 5-11): Favorite Name
Week 7 (February 12-18): Valentine
Week 8 (February 19-25): Heirloom
Week 9 (February 26-March 4): Where There’s a Will

2018: Week 6 ~ 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks: Favorite Name

I’m looking forward to starting another year-long of 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks with AmyJohnson Crow.  If you’ve never joined into this type of a weekly writing blog, check out her 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks site for more information. I first joined in 2014, opening my first blog and proud to say… I completed all 52 weeks on time! My 2014: 52 Week Ancestor Challenge can be found on the previous link.

2018: Week 6 ~ 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks

Favorite Name – Naming Patterns – Nicknames

6 week 3

In searching for popular names of 1900, it seems my husband’s family was covered in the use of names such as… John, Joseph, Frank, Mary, Fred, Margaret, Rose, Joe, Frank, Catherine, Josephine, Andrew, Michael, Pauline, Johnnie, Stephen, Nancy, Rosie, Jimmie, Nicholas, Steve, Celia, and Cecelia.

Favorite Name:

This weekly prompt was “Favorite Name”, but there were always two that I loved in his family… his grandmothers’ names… Domenica and Giacinta. I hinted a few times of using those names for my grandchildren, but that didn’t get me anywhere!

The name “Domenica” is a Spanish baby name, meaning as born on Sunday, although Grandma Minnie was born on a Tuesday, and named after her father’s mother, Domenica DeCuore; it is also the Italian feminine form of Dominic and an alternate form of the French name Dominique. I never learned her actual name until I began writing and researching the family history… I had only known her as Grandma Minnie… she was Minnie to everyone, although on her marriage certificate, her name was written as Michela.

Italian Naming Patterns

  • A first-born son is named after his paternal grandfather.
  • A second son born is named after his maternal grandfather.
  • A third, born son would be named after his father.
  • The first female is named after her paternal grandmother.
  • The second female is named after her maternal grandmother.
  • The third female is named after her mother.

Subsequent children born into the family were usually named after favorite aunts and uncles, or even deceased relatives. You’ll often find a child in the family with a deceased sibling of the same name. In the DeTulio family, there was a daughter, Antoinette, born in 1910, who only lived about six months. In 1911, another daughter was born and Guilia renamed her Antoinette… after the deceased daughter. (I was told this by Mary D. Pompone)

Naming Patterns were a family tradition in most Italian households and in looking through the families of Cambino, DeTulio, and Insalaco… I’ve written who was named for whom!

Giovanni & Guilia DeTulio

Giovanni Americanized into John and Guilia into Julia

DiTullio transformed into DeTullio and later DeTulio

  • Giuseppe DeTulio – named after his paternal grandfather, Giuseppe DiTullio
  • Domenica DeTulio – named after her paternal grandmother, Domenica DeCuore
  • Antoinette DeTulio – b. 1910, d. 1910
  • Antoinette DeTulio – b. 1911, named after her deceased sister.
  • Carmela DeTulio
  • Rosa DeTulio
  • Michael DeTulio
  • Maria DeTulio
  • Nicholas DeTulio
  • Andrew DeTulio
  • Lucia DeTulio – named after her mother’s sister Lucia Catalano
  • Josephine DeTulio

Guilia’s parents were Giovanni and Theresa Catalano, but yet none of the children received those names; I only found two siblings for Guilia… Giovanni Jr., and Lucia. I have no siblings for Giovanni DeTulio, so possibly the rest of the family was named for them.

John and Julia mostly spoke Italian in the home and their children grew up learning both … English at school, and Italian at home. John probably spoke more English in working outside the home, as he needed to be able to communicate with others. From all told to me, Julia spoke mostly Italian, with very few words in English… which made it hard for the great-grandchildren to have conversation with her, but I’m sure she was able to communicate with them by her daughters translating.

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Giuseppe Gambino / Cambino and Domenica DeTulio

Giuseppe became Joseph & Joe – Domenica became Michela & Minnie

Gambino transformed into Cambino

Giuseppe’s siblings were… Francesco, Maria Cristina, Salvatore, and Annunziata,

  • Catherine
  • Frederick Joseph named after his paternal grandfather Federico Gambino
  • Cecelia
  • John – named after his maternal grandfather Giovanni DeTulio
  • Frank named after his paternal uncle Francesco Gambino
  • Nancy named after her paternal aunt, Annunziata (Nunzia) Gambino
  • Antoinete named after her maternal aunt Antoinette DeTulio

Joe and Minnie spoke mostly English in their home… Minnie speaking more Italian as that had been her primary language in her home, but Joe was insistent that his children learn and only speak English. He wanted them to be more American and not associate in the customs and language of Italy. Later in life, his children wished just the opposite… wishing that they had learned Italian in the home and could speak both languages instead of only knowing English.

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Stefano Insalaco and Giacinta DiRosa

Stefano transformed into Stephen and Steve, but I never heard any name for Giacinta other than “Mama.”

  • Louise Rosario Insalaco – named after her paternal grandmother Louisa M. Cacciato
  • Anthony – named after his paternal grandfather Antonio F. Insalaco
  • Stephen Joseph Insalaco – named after his paternal grandfather Stefano Insalaco and also his maternal grandfather Stefano DiRosa
  • Maria A. Insalaco – named after her maternal grandmother Maria Stincone
  • Thomas Insalaco
  • Virginia Rosalie Insalaco
  • Peter Paul Insalaco named after his maternal great-grandfather Pietro Stincone
  • Ruth Insalaco
  • Martha Insalaco

As more second-generation were born in America, the custom of Italian naming patterns soon disappeared as they wanted their children to be more associated with being American and born here. Italian was not usually spoken in the Insalaco household… Giacinta often reverted to speaking more Italian, but was quickly prompted by her daughters to “speak English Mama“. I always enjoyed hearing her speak Italian, but they encouraged her to speak English.

Nicknames:

Cambino: Giuseppe Americanized his name quickly into Joseph and Joe, and later all the children, even Minnie referred to him as “the old man“, but only when he wasn’t around; it’s also said friends referred to him as such too. My husband remembers that when he was young, he’d heard his grandfather called that so often, that he thought it really was his name.

So many Cambino family members ended up with nicknames… “Cecelia” morphed to just Celia, but her brothers preferred to call her “york” or “yawk” and sometimes “yatti”. “Antoinete” became “dolly” because it was said that she didn’t like to play with dolls. Her brother Freddie often teased her by calling her “dreep“. The boys Frank, Fred and John Cambino transformed to Frankie, Johnny, and Freddie. After Johnny began racing at Savin Rock’s, West Haven Speedway, he became known as “King Cambo“, “King” and “Big John.” Later when Johnny Jr. was born, he soon became known as “little Johnny”… who does that anymore to their children? Even as they are all grown now, it’s hard to refrain from saying “little”… when calling them by name.

Daughter, Nancy Cambino never seemed to have had a nickname, but when her niece Nancy Cambino was born, daughter of Johnny and Maggie, the baby quickly became “little Nancy.” It worked the same way with Dolly’s son, Joseph Burgarello… he was called “little Joey“, as his father was known as “Joe, Joey, and Joey Bags“. My husband, Steve Insalaco, was called “beans” or “string bean” by his uncles… why… because he was thin as a bean pole as a young boy; his son followed in that same trait and uncle Frankie often called him “little beans.” If you weren’t named after a family member, you escaped the “little” in your name. My husband called our daughter Melissa, “sunshine“… not quite sure why, but it flowed with her name.

Sister, Catherine, was always Catherine… no nickname, but her husband James Donahue was known as Jimmy and Jim, and Uncle Gee by his nephews and nieces. Sister Nancy married Gennaro Cavallaro, who was known by the American version of Gene. Their son Paul escaped the “little”, as his middle name was Gene, but his son Paul quickly became known as “little Paul”, but he’s outgrown that now as he has a “little Paul” to carry on.
DeTulio: In the DeTulio family, we have Michael DeTulio, who became known as “O’Toole”, Josephine was shortened to “JoJo”, Rosaria DeTulio became Rose, Rosie, and later “Roseburg” or “the bird” because of her married name Burzynski. Antoinette was most often called by her given name but sometimes was called “Antoine”. Antoinette married James Carbone, who was called “Jimmy Brown”… a name given to him as his boxing name; one son Joseph “Johnny” Carbone somehow acquired the nickname of “Johhnycakes”… no one has figured out who nicknamed him or why… might we assume he loved johnnycakes? When Lucy DeTulio married Frank Romano, they became known as “Lulu and Rummy.” I’ve never heard anyone refer to their brother Andrew other than his given name, but just recently a cousin referred to him as Uncle Andy. Their brother Nicholas became Nicky to everyone, Carmela was shortened to Carmel and Mary was always known as Mary, no nickname! What’s most remembered about Mary… is her cooking!

Insalaco: The Insalaco family didn’t seem to have nicknames as the Cambino and DeTulio families had. My father in law, Stephen, was mostly called Steve and later more as Stef. His sister, Maria, was called Mary and his brother Antonio went by Tony.

If I’ve missed any of the family nicknames… please let me know so I might add to the story.

52 ancesors with name

Like to read more, click on… 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks

© 2018, copyright Jeanne Bryan Insalaco; all rights reserved

The prompts for February are:
Week 6 (February 5-11): Favorite Name
Week 7 (February 12-18): Valentine
Week 8 (February 19-25): Heirloom
Week 9 (February 26-March 4): Where There’s a Will

2018: Week 4 ~ 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks: In the Census

2018: Week 4 ~ 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks In the Census

I’m looking forward to starting another year-long of 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks with AmyJohnson Crow.  If you’ve never joined into this type of a weekly writing blog, check out her 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks site for more information. I first joined in 2014, opening my first blog and proud to say… I completed all 52 weeks on time! My 2014: 52 Week Ancestor Challenge can be found on the previous link.

Week 5

My husband’s family came here in the early part of the twentieth century as immigrants from Italy. I thought I’d focus on 1930 through the 1940 census to see how they prospered in the beginning of the depression, to the end.

The three family lines that immigrated from Italy to the United States:

  • Stefano Insalaco (Stephen Insalaco) – March 13, 1909 / April 9, 1920
  • Giuseppe Gambino (Joseph Cambino) – May 27, 1913
  • Giovanni DeTullio (John DeTulio) – Aug. 02, 1906 / April 22, 1909 (Giulia Catalano -DeTulio

Giovanni DeTullio (John DeTulio)

1930 DeTulio censusFIX

DeTullio/DeTulio, 1930 Census

John DeTullio first came to New Haven, CT. in 1906, and continued to live in the “Little Italy” area at addresses of 2 Olive St., and 5, 15, 42, and 45 Warren St. He worked in various jobs, with the first one found working for Star Line Co. (N.H.S.C.) as a dock hand at Belle Dock (record found on the 1918 WWI Registration Card). Later he found work at a local New Haven lumber company… DeForest & Hotchkiss at 115 Water St. John seemed to always work near his home as he didn’t drive.

1917 CT Military Census

In the 1917 military census, John was listed as married, living at 5 Warren St., could not drive, was not a citizen, and had never served in the military; his occupation was listed as a stableman.

The 1930 Census, shows that John and wife, Julia (Giulia) were living at 2 Olive Street, with their nine children, Antoinette, Carmela, Rosa, Michael, Nicholas, Maria, Andrew, Lucy, and Josephine; the children’s ages varied from 2 months to 19 years of age. At this time they rented, paying $21 dollars a month. Neither John or Julia were listed as able to read and write, but all children of school age were listed as able to. Their language spoken was Italian… and from accounts, I’ve heard it was always their dominant language used in their home. Several of their grandchildren that did know their grandparents, told me how they never had much communication with their grandparents as they didn’t speak Italian. The one odd question on this census to me was “did they own a radio?”… it was noted that “yes” they did.

By the time the 1940 Census was taken, the family had moved from 2 Olive St. to 42 Warren St., which was just around the corner… still remaining in the Italian area of New Haven. The family rented there at $16 dollars a month. I was told that he often moved the family to less expensive rents through the years, and on Warren St., much family lived there; as far as I’ve found he never bought, only rented. By 1951, Julia, widow of John DeTulio, was living at 55 Carlisle St. in New Haven with son Nicholas. (I’m not sure if she rented or owned)

DeTullio / DeTulio Through the years

Detulio census 1

Detulio census 2

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Giuseppe Gambino (Joseph Cambino) – May 27, 1913

Giuseppe arrived in the United States as a young man, age eighteen, on May 27, 1913. As jobs were scarce, it pushed him to quickly join the Army in WWI on July 20, 1917. That may have been his best choice, as he came out of the Army as a barber. We are not sure if he knew barbering before entering, but it was told to me by sons Johnny and Frank, that he came out of the Army as a Barber; it was told he cut hair while in the Army.

Cambino ship Clip

Giuseppe Gambino (Cambino) arrived May 27, 1913

Even though I found Giuseppe’s destination listed on the ship manifest at Ellis Island for 178 Frank St. in New Haven, ct., I never found him actually listed in the city directory until 1920, after returning from WWI; he was listed as a barber at 668 Washington Ave., West Haven, with a residence now of 178 Frank St.; previously listed there was a Thomas Foormichella and Grava Angelo. He may have boarded with them and his name never given; they were boarding houses on Frank St.

1930 Cambino Census1930FIX

1930 Census: Joseph Cambino and family

On the 1930 census, Joseph was now married, working of his own accord at his barber shop (Buddy’s Barber Shop) on Washington Ave. in West Haven… but living at 294 York St.; he owned this home with a value of $6000, and 3 children were living at home… Catherine, Fred, and Celia. Joseph was listed as able to read and write and speak English, which was their primary language spoken in the home; all the children spoke and read English. I was told that he never spoke in Italian… only wanting his children to speak English… he wanted them to be American. Joseph also owned a radio, and from his grandson, Steve, he enjoyed listening to his radio while working in the barbershop; he kept one on a shelf in the shop that was always on. They also had one on a shelf in their kitchen at home and it’s the very one that we have today in our kitchen.

radio

Grandpa Joe Cambino’s radio.

Joseph Cambino came here at the youngest age (18) of my husband’s grandparents… coming here as a single man… and the only one to own a business… and buy a house at an early age. He operated his own business by age 25, never rented except for when he first arrived… and bought three houses during his lifetime. He and his wife, Minnie (Domenica) lived in a small back room in the building of the barber shop, but within a year or two, he bought his first house on York St.in West Haven, Ct. (It seems Giuseppe Cambino was the most prosperous of my husband’s immigrant grandparents.)

Gambino / Cambino Through the Years

Cambino year listing

Cambino year listing 2

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Stefano Insalaco (Stephen Insalaco) – March 13, 1909 / April 9, 1920

Stephen Insalaco entered the United States more than once as a single man, but it wasn’t until 1920 did he return as a married man with his family, daughter Louise, and son Anthony. It’s told he was ordered to serve in the Italian army before being allowed to leave with his family.

1930 insalacoFIX

Insalaco, 1930 Census

Stefano first came in 1909 with his brother, Gaetano… both listing their destination as N.Y., with an address of 3 Monroe St.  It was told to me that he didn’t remain long in the United States before returning to Italy. He returned soon to Italy, but it was also said that he went to Argentina to work on laying train tracks; I was never able to find anything on those trips. But I do know that he returned to Italy, and remained there to serve in their Army… by their demands. Before returning with his family, he once again came to live with cousins in Willimantic and worked in the Willimantic Thread mills.

By 1920, he returned, for the final time, to the United States… bringing his wife, Giacinta, and two children, Louise, age 2 and Anthony, age 2 months. Their destination was to cousins in Willimantic, CT., where work was promised in the Willimantic Thread Mill as a weaver; he had worked there on a previous trip.

The 1930 Census finds Stephen and Giacinta have moved their family to Shelton, Ct. where’s he has found work at Bloomenthols, also a textile mill. They rented for $15 dollars monthly at 131 Oak. St… both were listed as able to read and write… and six children were living at home; no radio was owned.

They made a few moves during the 1940’s but was found at 346 Coram Ave. in 1940. His occupation had remained as a weaver, but now renting at a price of $18 dollars a month. It was noted that he did not work at all in 1939 and their other income was “zero;” with 9 children at home, not sure how he supported them all. It was told to me that at one time, Giancinta took in laundry and later worked at a local shirt factory folding shirts. I’m sure there was some income coming in as my father-in-law always talked about how he worked at a local grocery store delivering groceries from age 8, to help support the family. After leaving Coram Avenue, they bought their first house on Kneen Street.

Insalaco Through the Years

Insalaco listings 1

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Only two out of my husband’s three grandparents who immigrated here bought houses. It seems the one (Joseph Cambino) who came here at the youngest age of 18, and single… worked himself up the ladder at a quicker pace. Was it because he acquired an occupation of a barber in the Army? However it happened, he worked for himself, quickly owning his own business.

If I hadn’t already gathered information on his grandparents, I would have discovered much information through the census… such as year of immigration, marital status, where immigrated from, residences, children, age at marriage, and property owned.

52 ancesors with name

Like to read more, click on… 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks

© 2018, copyright Jeanne Bryan Insalaco; all rights reserved

Week 1 (Jan 1-7): Start

Week 2 (Jan 8-14): Favorite Photo

Week 3 (Jan 15-21): Longevity

Week 4 (Jan 22-28): Invite to Dinner

Week 5 (Jan 29-Feb 4): In the Census